Hitchcock’s Cameos

Hitchcock CameosJim Dalrymple, The Loop:

I’ve long been a fan of Alfred Hitchcock. Rear Window, North by Northwest, The 39 Steps, all great films, in my opinion. One of my favorite elements of Hitchcock’s filming was his Easter egg gift to his fans. He appeared in some form or another in every one of his movies. Usually, he was an extra in a scene with no lines. Sometimes, he was simply in a picture hanging on a wall.

Here’s a multipage article laying out all of those cameos. But there’s no substitute for seeing this for yourself. Watch the video below for a nice sampling. No, these are not all of them and yes, there are some typos, but I loved the effort. Gosh, Psycho, Strangers on a Train, The Man Who Knew Too Much. So many more.

You may look at the cameos in the video below; for more detail see Jim Dalrymple’s link above to filmsite.org — which by the way is a new site for me, and looks intriguing.  I’ll have to explore a little further.

Film Brief: The Lady Vanishes

The Lady Vanishes - poster

The Lady Vanishes (1938) was the penultimate film Hitchcock made in England before moving to the U.S., was a big hit at the time of release, and has a 97% Tomatometer score.  So as a Hitchcock fan who has not seen much in the way of his early films, The Lady Vanishes - still largeI was expecting good things.  What I found was a film with a decent measure of mystery and drama, mixed in with a lot of silliness.  By today’s standards, there’s a good deal of cheese to be found aboard this train.  But it’s all good fun.

The Lady Vanishes may be seen as a precursor to both Hitchcock’s later and greater works, and to a number of contemporary films, most obviously Jodie Foster’s Flightplan.  My recommendation: if you’re a Hitchcock fan and have seen a good number of his works, you will probably find this one worthwhile.  But if you haven’t seen much Hitchcock, skip this one in favor of his timeless, latter-era classics.  6/10