Fresh & Fit, Queen & Slim

There’s a lot to like in Queen & Slim. The base story is not particularly original, but the film has a fresh feel and authenticity to the relationship of our couple on the run. The romantic development is nicely handled, and it’s got a good vibe.

Never did the film slip into corniness, but neither was it ever quite edge-of-your-seat, except during that first pullover scene. You’re invested into these two, but the whole journey isn’t as harrowing as it ought to be. The worst part was that the theory of the rope is played a little two often, and the conclusion is trite. There’s also a sense I had in a couple moments that the movie was pandering to a black audience. Michelle Goldberg, an opinion columnist, not a film critic, of the Times wrote:

I left a recent matinee of “Queen & Slim,” the mesmerizing new outlaw romance directed by Melina Matsoukas, astonished on two levels. The film itself kept me rapt; I cried through the end and left the theater with the dazed, disoriented feeling you get when a movie makes you momentarily forget everything else in your life. But as amazed as I was by the experience of watching the film, I was equally amazed that it got made at all.

Talk about overstating it. I wonder what one of the better Lars von Trier films would do to her. It’s almost like this was only the eleventh or twelfth movie she’s ever seen. That hackneyed ending should not make anyone who reads my blog cry.

(Minor) SPOILER ALERT: Side note: where did this title come from? Neither character is ever referred to as Queen or Slim in the entire picture. And I get the Queen thing, but Daniel Kaluuya isn’t particularly slim. He’s not overweight or anything, but neither is he a string bean. I really like the title, but can you throw me a bone sometime during the movie?

END (Minor) SPOILER

I was at a 7 for most of the film, rising to an 8 at times, but the conclusion was a letdown. A lot of lovely elements, including the settings and the music. A dance-club scene takes you under its beat. By the end the swampy story elements add up to a knock-down. 6/10

Comparison Notes: Thelma & Louise, Wild at Heart, Breaking the Waves

Film Brief: Searching


Searching runs at a nice dramatic pace with no letup.  Everything is from the view of webcams; try to seen in a theater that doesn’t chop off the top and bottom of the screen as did the overpriced place where I saw it.  The film was weakened with an overly simplistic and unsatisfying conclusion, but this is a good movie. 7/10

Film Brief: The Accountant [u]

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Just as quickly as The Accountant builds up periods of true entertainment, it dashes them on the rocks.  Sort of like when the Chargers are up by 3 touchdowns going into the fourth quarter: you know they’re going to lose.  5/10

Notes: Comparison: strangely enough, I didn’t think of any other films when watching this one.  Maybe because in the dull moments I was thinking of enchiladas.  Other: Normally I don’t include the trailer for movies I don’t recommend, but I hold no animosity toward The Accountant.  I was very fond of certain moments and most of the cast — centered on Ben Affleck and Anna Kendrick.  But as I said the film was bungled… or fumbled, to draw back the Chargers analogy.

You could even say it’s some kind of masterpiece compared to the dismal Girl on the Train.

UPDATE (1/28/17) — Yes they dropped the ball here.  But there’s a nice entertainment factor that shouldn’t be wiped away.  And Anna Kendrick… gotta love her.  6/10

VOD Log: Two Step

Two Step - poster

Credit to my sister for bringing this low budget indie to my attention.  Two Step features a good, tense storyline driven by one mean hombre.  But a movie needs depth.  6/10

Availability: Netflix, iTunes

Two Step - text blockComparison Notes: (all recommended, and better examples of what Two Step was trying to achieve): I’ll See You in My Dreams, Last House on the Left, Eden Lake, Vacancy

Cinematic Greats: 48 Hrs.

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A great movie and an 80’s flashback in one!  Sometimes a movie just hits all the right notes.  That may sound clichéd, but hear me now and believe me later: 48 Hrs. is a fantastic, funny as hell movie with a great Dirty Harry-inspired villain and a thrilling storyline — much more than one could expect in Eddie Murphy’s debut.

If you never saw it, do yourself a favor and catch 48 Hrs., an essential picture that holds its place among the many great movies of the period.

Availability: Netflix

48 Hrs. - still - Murphy

Cinematic Greats: Bound

Bound - poster

Terrifically fun, highly stylized modern film noir with lots of dark humor — in 2008, I wrote:

Bound, 1996, with Jennifer Tilly and Gina Gershon, is a delightful mob movie with a twist – the mobster, played uniquely with humor by Joe Pantoliano, becomes the target of a plot against him by his wife (Tilly) and Gershon.  I saw this in the theater when it came out.  It is the only movie I can think of where after about 10 minutes into the film, I was literally on the edge of my seat for the duration of the picture.

Bound - text blockRoger Ebert awarded his highest rating:

“Bound” is one of those movies that works you up, wrings you out and leaves you gasping. It’s pure cinema, spread over several genres. It’s a caper movie, a gangster movie, a sex movie and a slapstick comedy. It’s not often you think of “The Last Seduction” and the Marx Brothers during the same film, but I did during this one–and I also thought about “Blood Simple” and Woody Allen. It’s amazing to discover all this virtuosity and confidence in two first-time filmmakers, Larry and Andy Wachowski, self-described college dropouts, still in their 20s, from Chicago.

So in other words, for a dose of the Wachowskis, you’re better off watching Bound — even a second or third time — than opting for their most recent offering, Jupiter Ascending.  It’s funny that Bound ended up a somewhat forgotten film, while their Matrix enterprise became completely ubiquitous, a staple of cinema.

BONUS!  Bound’s available on Netflix.