Sony Employee: “people using Macs were fine”

This from a Sony employee:

“… Everyone is a little calmer now after the initial shock.  A couple of people had their computers removed but people using Macs were fine,” she said.  She said most work is done on iPads and iPhones.

Lesson for businesses and individuals alike: stick to Apple for your tech.  Apple devices are not impenetrable, but they’re a lot more secure than the alternatives.

And following up on my post yesterday regarding Sony pulling the Christmas release of The Interview, a post I 100% concur with — with the exception that I understand Sony was bowing to pressure from the theatre chains.  From The Loop:

Vice:

It is mind boggling to me, particularly when you compare it to real things that have actually happened. Someone killed 12 people and shot another 70 people at the opening night of Batman: The Dark Knight. They kept that movie in the theaters. You issue an anonymous cyber threat that you did not have the capability to carry out? We pulled a movie from 18,000 theaters.

There’s probably no worse way for Sony to have handled this. Incredible how messed up this has become.

Paranoia will destroy ya.

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Hitchcock’s Cameos

Hitchcock CameosJim Dalrymple, The Loop:

I’ve long been a fan of Alfred Hitchcock. Rear Window, North by Northwest, The 39 Steps, all great films, in my opinion. One of my favorite elements of Hitchcock’s filming was his Easter egg gift to his fans. He appeared in some form or another in every one of his movies. Usually, he was an extra in a scene with no lines. Sometimes, he was simply in a picture hanging on a wall.

Here’s a multipage article laying out all of those cameos. But there’s no substitute for seeing this for yourself. Watch the video below for a nice sampling. No, these are not all of them and yes, there are some typos, but I loved the effort. Gosh, Psycho, Strangers on a Train, The Man Who Knew Too Much. So many more.

You may look at the cameos in the video below; for more detail see Jim Dalrymple’s link above to filmsite.org — which by the way is a new site for me, and looks intriguing.  I’ll have to explore a little further.

All the World’s a Stage

From The Loop, which should be on everyone’s reading list:

This is fascinating to watch, certainly, but it also raises an interesting point.  I found the meaning in this monologue much clearer, much easier to digest, because it was broken up into fragments, each of which was filmed as an individual scene.  There’s a lesson there for teachers, I think.  Regardless, enjoy.